ADVICE FOR YOUR BUCKET LIST

Do you know what a bucket list is? Most people think it is a list of things you want to do before you die. A typical guess is people want to visit a particular place before dying. Based on an unscientific poll about bucket lists, that is not a bad guess. Travel appears to be a frequent bucket list ambition.  Anne is an American who is proud her ancestors lived for centuries on the group of small islands in the English Channel between the southern coast of England and mainland Europe.

REDUCE STRESS, INCREASE ENJOYMENT FOR A HAPPY 2018

Family caregivers provide practical assistance and enhance the quality of life for frail seniors who might otherwise require placement in a long-term-care facility. Typically, caregivers are spouses or adult children, many of whom are seniors themselves. Their role involves physical, psychological, emotional and financial demands. It can be a heavy load.  If you are a caregiver, consider the following strategies for not only surviving but thriving in the year ahead.

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DISCOVER A LOVE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

Curiosity, exploring interests and engagement are a few crucial ingredients to healthy and happy longevity. Enrolling in a class just for the love of learning is a great way to do this. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of Kentucky offers educational and enrichment courses, forums, shared interest groups, trips and more for adults age 50 years and older. Membership for the full year is $25; summer programs are at a prorated fee.

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Performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has gotten simpler in recent years. Previously, people had to take a two-to four-hour class to receive certification. But now the rescue method can be learned in five minutes or less. It has been honed down to two major points: First, dial 911. Second, pump directly and firmly on the victim’s chest with both hands. This is known as hands-only CPR. Even doing something as simple as this until more help arrives can be the difference between life and death.


Formerly, people were advised to clear the airway of the person to whom they were administering CPR, including using the fingers to scoop inside the person’s mouth, then holding his nose and blowing into the airway. Today CPR is much easier. The American Red Cross is probably the best-known organization supplying this life-saving information. The Web site for its training and videos can be found here: www.redcross.org


Start by asking the person if he is OK. Check to see if he has stopped breathing. If there is no response, call 911 or have someone else do so while you begin administrating CPR. Place the heel of one hand on the center of the person’s chest. Place the heel of the other hand on top of the first hand and lace your fingers together. Keep your arms straight, positioning your shoulders directly over your hands. Push hard and fast – at least 2 inches deep 100 times per minute.

YOU SHOULD LEARN HANDS-ONLY CPR

Let the chest rise completely before you push down again. Stopping the compressions gives the blood a greater chance to pool and cease circulating. Stop only if the person begins breathing again; if you are exhausted; or when another trained person or EMS arrives to take over.


Dr. Scott Edminster, medical director of the Spokane Fire Department, says only about 10 percent of people will survive if they get shocked with an automated external defibrillators (AED) at eight minutes. “But if chest compressions are administered right when the person goes down, you can alter that death curve significantly,” he said. AEDs are becoming more prevalent in schools, churches and workplaces. They greatly increase a victim’s chances for survival. It’s important to note CPR alone does not necessarily get the heart going again after cardiac arrest, but it significantly improves the chances of the person responding to the AED.


Time is the key issue with hands-only CPR and the use of an AED. If the resuscitation efforts go past 10 minutes, the chances of survival are greatly reduced.

CHARLES SEBASTIAN

Charles Sebastian is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

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