HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

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WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

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to prevent the possible spread of the disease. A quarantine is appropriate when one or more people have been exposed to a contagious disease (although they may not have developed any symptoms) to avoid infecting others who haven’t been exposed.


For COVID-19, the recommended quarantine period is 14 days from the last date of exposure. Fourteen days is the longest incubation period for similar coronaviruses. Other viruses, like the common cold or flu, spread more during the cold weather months, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months. It is not yet known whether warmer temperatures will affect the spread of COVID-19.


There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity and other factors associated with COVID-19; investigations are ongoing. To protect yourself and others from COVID-19, practice the following:


WHAT IS A NOVEL CORONAVIRUS?

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person to person through respiratory droplets.


A person who is actively infected with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. For this reason, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends these patients be isolated either at home or at the hospital (depending on how sick they are) until they’re better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others. How long a person is actively sick can vary, so deciding when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis using these requirements:



You have probably been self-quarantining at the recommendation of health and governmental officials. Quarantine means separating a person or group of people

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people while others only infect animals. Rarely, animal coronaviruses infect and can spread between people. This is what was suspected to have occurred with the virus that causes COVID-19.


The virus was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The first infections were related to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading person to person. It seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (community spread) in affected areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in a certain area.


Some people infected with the COVID-19 virus have no symptoms. When the virus does cause symptoms, common ones include:



COVID-19 can also cause more severe symptoms, such as high fever, severe cough and shortness of breath.