HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+


Be flexible about plans and expectations, since your care recipient’s needs and, consequently, your energy level are likely to vary/fluctuate.


Adapt Activities of Daily Living

If you don’t already have one, get an answering machine to screen calls.


Concentrate home cleaning and tidying efforts on the rooms you use most.


Collect recipes for one-dish meals, such as casseroles, stews, stir fries and main course salads.


Cook double batches of recipes and freeze half for later use.


Keep a supply of heat-and-serve entrees in the freezer.


Buy convenience foods that reduce preparation time: packaged salads, shredded cheese and boneless chicken breasts, for example.


Order takeout meals periodically; just ensure your choices are healthy.


Arrange with the bank for direct deposit of pension and other checks and automatic payments of regular bills.


Sign up for telephone or Internet banking so you can pay bills, transfer money and check balances from home.


Shop by mail order whenever possible. Take advantage of stores and other services that offer home delivery – for example, grocery stores, drug stores and dry cleaners.


Research mobile services in your area, such as foot care or phlebotomy (taking blood) if the care receiver requires one or both on a regular basis. Also look for dental hygiene services, hairdressing, dog grooming, car washing and detailing and automobile servicing and repair.


Keep to-do lists, consolidate errands and avoid peak use times of the day, week and month when visiting stores, banks, government offices and other establishments.

TIME MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

Hire Help

Pay for help if you can afford it – for example, a dog walker, housecleaning service, grounds-keeping service, handyman or accountant.


Hire a professional organizer if you’re overwhelmed by paper or general clutter.


If finances permit, hire a companion or personal support worker for your care receiver so you can regularly get out to church, a class or some other leisure activity. Let loved ones know a gift certificate to a home healthcare agency or an IOU for respite care would be welcomed for special occasions.


Streamline and Prioritize

Curb perfectionism. Not everything needs to be done to a high standard, such as housework and yard maintenance, for example. Set a time limit for chores if necessary.


Establish and stick to priorities so you don’t waste time or energy on unimportant things.

LISA M. PETSCHE




Lisa M. Petsche is a social worker and a freelance writer specializing in boomer and senior health matters. She has personal and professional experience with eldercare.

Responsibilities of family caregivers typically include chauffeuring, shopping, running errands, paying bills, coordinating medical and other appointments, yard work, home maintenance, housekeeping, preparing meals, managing medication and assisting with personal care.


It’s easy to become overwhelmed by all the demands. There doesn’t seem to be enough hours in the day for a caregiver to get everything done, let alone spend time with other important people (such as a spouse) or devote time to self-care.


If you are a caregiver, here are some practical ways to save time that may help you manage the stress inherent in your role.


Get Help

Accept offers of help. If these offers aren’t forthcoming, take the initiative and ask other family members to share the load. Be specific about the kind of assistance you need.


Investigate available community respite services, such as friendly visiting, adult day care programs and residential facilities that offer short-term care. Also look into volunteer driver programs and accessible transportation services that can free you from chauffeuring duties. Information on these and other resources can be obtained from your local office on aging.