HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+


THE SECRET OF CINNAMON AND YOUR BRAIN HEALTH


You may already have cinnamon in your kitchen cupboard and probably use it occasionally. There are two common types of cinnamon: Ceylon and cassia. When adding cinnamon to your daily diet, a little can go a long way. Just half a teaspoon to one teaspoon a day is all that is recommended. Try a little sprinkle in your cereal or oatmeal or on your scrambled eggs. Have a pinch of cinnamon in your coffee or tea and drink to good brain health.


Sources and Resources


DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by dr thomas W. Miller

Cinnamon may do much more than just making your food or beverages taste better. Cinnamon has one of the highest antioxidant levels of any spice or many other foods, for that matter. Did you know there are as many antioxidants in one teaspoon of cinnamon as there are in a full cup of pomegranate juice or a cup of blueberries? If you like cinnamon gum, you may benefit because that flavor of gum may aid in keeping your brain sharp. This is because cinnamon is known to regulate blood sugar levels, which can be especially good news for individuals with diabetes.


This jewel of a spice has been known as brain healthy for centuries. The ancient Egyptians believed cinnamon was a real medicinal treasure. They believed cinnamon had healthful medicinal properties that made it an extremely sought-after nutrient. Cinnamon has been the object of several research studies that show it has the potential to delay cognitive impairment because it appears to improve certain cognitive functions and reduce oxidation in the brain. It has the added benefits of reducing inflammation, fighting bacteria and making you more alert.


Cinnamon may be beneficial for some patients with Parkinson’s disease because it protects dopamine production systems and improves motor function. It is a good source of the powerful antioxidant manganese that is crucial for brain and body health. Two teaspoons of cinnamon provides about half the RDA of manganese.