Staying Fit through Volunteering in Your Community

HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+

Broadly defined, a volunteer is a person who performs a service willingly and without pay for another person, group or organization. Volunteering is generally considered to be an altruistic activity. It is also renowned for skill development and is often intended to promote goodness or to improve human quality of life.


If you are looking for an opportunity to make a difference in someone else’s life, volunteering broadens your opportunities to make new friends and become a part of a community of helping and caring people. Erik Erikson, the respected German-born American developmental psychologist and psychoanalyst, is internationally known for his theory on the psychosocial development of human beings. Within that theory, he notes human beings across all ages who have had a trusting and caring life experience grow to a stage where they wish to share what they have become with others. He explains this through his life stages of generativity versus self-absorption. The generative person becomes more concerned with the health and well-being of others and seeks ways in which to share those good feelings with them. On the other hand, the self-absorbed person focuses more on meeting his or her own needs.


Health care organizations such as UK Health Care, Kentucky One Health and Baptist Health provide opportunities for volunteering through programs they provide within their health-care facilities.

STAYING FIT THROUGH VOLUNTEERING IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Many former patients as well as family and friends see volunteering as a way to give back for the care and treatment they received in times of need.


Baptist Health of Lexington has about 150 adult volunteers who contribute more than 32,000 hours to the hospital each year. Its VolunTeen program provides teenagers an opportunity to experience volunteering. The Volunteer Services team at Baptist Health Lexington always enjoys speaking with anyone interested in volunteer opportunities. Information is available on its Web site at www.bhlexvolunteers.com. Information about volunteering elsewhere in Lexington is available at www.justserve.org.


When it comes to staying fit, volunteers have great opportunities to experience plenty of exercise and physical activity along with using healthy mental skills that include being generative to others in their community.


SOURCES

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by dr thomas W. Miller