12 WAYS TO HELP AN ALZHEIMERS CAREGIVER

One in 10 Americans over age 65 years and almost half of those over age 85 years have Alzheimer’s disease or a related type of dementia.  Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, involves a gradual breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. Affected persons lose the ability to interpret information and send messages to their bodies to behave in certain ways. Over time they experience mental, emotional, behavioral and physical changes, necessitating increasing amounts of….

PROBATE BASICS

Probate is the legal process of transferring ownership of property from the decedent to his or her heirs either by accepting the validity of their last will and testament or by following the Kentucky laws of intestacy.  For a will to be valid, it must be “self-proven” or proven as valid in court by at least one of the witnesses.  A valid will can also be holographic: written entirely in the handwriting of the decedent, signed, and dated.

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CONTAINER GARDENING

Gardens are great, but they require a lot of time, labor and money. They also require land space and good soil. Container gardening skirts all these obstacles, offering reduced time, effort and costs, and can be enjoyed in an apartment or other home lacking a yard. Vegetables and herbs can be grown in containers on a balcony, patio or walkway.

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or she wants to achieve. The most important thing is to find a system that works best for you and your partner. It will make for a happier relationship with less arguing and more time enjoying one another.

One of the many things a couple should discuss before marriage is finances. Financial issues are among the top three leading causes of divorce in the United States, according to the Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts (www.institutedfa.com).


It is important to know your partner’s financial stance as you enter into a serious relationship and definitely before getting married. Finances can make or break a relationship. Different spending habits, different financial goals and financial secrets should all be things you discuss with you partner so you can know whether you can see yourself dealing with those issues for an extended period. Different upbringings and different attitudes towards money also need to be addressed early on.


As with everything, the key is balance. It is essential that you and your partner are able to balance your differences in financial beliefs. Be willing to compromise. Here are some ways to address money so you can discover what works best for you and your partner:


Action Plan.

Have the saver manage the money and create a plan with some assistance from the spender. The saver should take full responsibility of accounts and review spending history. Set a plan for purchasing things that are more expensive and may take more time to save up for.

RELATIONSHIPS: SPENDERS VS. SAVERS

Set expectations on the amount you want to have in various accounts and how you want to distribute money into the account.


Allowance.

Each partner should get an allowance each month for personal expenses. It may be the same amount for each person or different amounts based on each person’s monthly expenses. Make sure to discuss each amount with your partner and come to an agreement. It is also important to decide what the personal allowance will cover: going out with friends, clothes, lunches?


Separate Funds.

Find a way to keep funds such as checking and savings separate. You and your partner could also have separate accounts. You may choose to set up one checking account, one savings account and one fund from which to pay bills.


They say opposites attract. You two can learn from one another’s money-handling habits. The spender might help the saver splurge every once in a while. The saver may help the spender develop more discipline and work toward a financial goal he

TANIQUA WARD, M.S

TaNiqua Ward is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

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