WHEN YOUR LOVED ONE IS ABUSED IN A NURSING HOME: A PERSONAL STORY

My sister opened the door of our mother’s nursing home room one afternoon just in time to see the nursing assistant hit her. It was a real haymaker that snapped Mother’s head back.

“Why did you hit my mother?” my sister asked.

“I asked her to sit up and she didn’t,” the young woman replied. Our mother was....

….FULL ARTICLE

MARRIED COUPLE MEDICAID ASSET PRESERVATION USING RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS

Medicaid Resource Assessment are an important tool to understand and utilize when one spouse is in need of long term care. A portion of the Medicaid rules is designed to protect the community spouse (spouse at home) from impoverishment and unnecessary dissipation of family assets. Only the institutionalized spouse (spouse in a facility) is required to have assets of $2,000 or less and a pre-paid funeral.

….FULL ARTICLE

CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUPS: IS THERE ONE THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU?

If you’re a caregiver, you may have already read articles about the importance of preventing burnout. Usually these articles include a suggestion to join a support group. Perhaps you’re reluctant to do so because you wonder what caregiver groups are all about and whether joining one would really help you.  The overall goal of caregiver support groups is to enhance participants’ coping skills through mutual support and information sharing. Objectives may include:.....

….FULL ARTICLE

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or she wants to achieve. The most important thing is to find a system that works best for you and your partner. It will make for a happier relationship with less arguing and more time enjoying one another.

One of the many things a couple should discuss before marriage is finances. Financial issues are among the top three leading causes of divorce in the United States, according to the Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts (www.institutedfa.com).


It is important to know your partner’s financial stance as you enter into a serious relationship and definitely before getting married. Finances can make or break a relationship. Different spending habits, different financial goals and financial secrets should all be things you discuss with you partner so you can know whether you can see yourself dealing with those issues for an extended period. Different upbringings and different attitudes towards money also need to be addressed early on.


As with everything, the key is balance. It is essential that you and your partner are able to balance your differences in financial beliefs. Be willing to compromise. Here are some ways to address money so you can discover what works best for you and your partner:


Action Plan.

Have the saver manage the money and create a plan with some assistance from the spender. The saver should take full responsibility of accounts and review spending history. Set a plan for purchasing things that are more expensive and may take more time to save up for.

RELATIONSHIPS: SPENDERS VS. SAVERS

Set expectations on the amount you want to have in various accounts and how you want to distribute money into the account.


Allowance.

Each partner should get an allowance each month for personal expenses. It may be the same amount for each person or different amounts based on each person’s monthly expenses. Make sure to discuss each amount with your partner and come to an agreement. It is also important to decide what the personal allowance will cover: going out with friends, clothes, lunches?


Separate Funds.

Find a way to keep funds such as checking and savings separate. You and your partner could also have separate accounts. You may choose to set up one checking account, one savings account and one fund from which to pay bills.


They say opposites attract. You two can learn from one another’s money-handling habits. The spender might help the saver splurge every once in a while. The saver may help the spender develop more discipline and work toward a financial goal he

TANIQUA WARD, M.S

TaNiqua Ward is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

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