HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

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WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

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It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose or eyes. However, health officials do not think this is the main way the virus spreads. COVID-19 can live for hours or days on a surface, depending on factors such as sunlight and humidity. Social distancing helps limit contact with infected people and contaminated surfaces.


Although the risk of severe illness may be different for everyone, anyone can get and spread COVID-19. A person may have been exposed to the virus without knowing it (for example, when traveling or out in the community) or they could have the virus without feeling symptoms. Everyone can play a role in slowing the spread and protecting themselves, their family and their community. You can stay connected with family, coworkers and loved ones through phone calls, video chats and social media. Together we can stop the spread of COVID-19. The sooner we all comply, the sooner we will all be together again at work, worship, at restaurants and other social settings.

SOCIAL DISTANCING WORKS


Many grocery stores and other venues that are still open have marked places where customers must stand. Don’t think of it as an inconvenience purposely put in place to annoy you. It has been proven social distancing really does work and helps to flatten the curve. You may want to consider enlisting a grocery delivery service or order your medications online.


The CDC says when COVID-19 is spreading in your area, everyone should limit close contact with individuals outside your household in indoor and outdoor spaces. Since people can spread the virus before they know they are sick, it is important to stay away from others whenever possible, even if you have no symptoms. Social distancing is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick. These include people whose health is already compromised, those with underlying health concerns and people age 60 years and older.

It’s a new phrase for most of us: social distancing. As the coronavirus pandemic widens, health officials have been advocating social distancing as the best way to prevent the spread of COVID-19.


Social distancing, also called physical distancing, means deliberately keeping physical space between yourself and other people outside of your home to avoid spreading illness. Staying at least 6 feet away from other people lessens your chances of catching and/or spreading COVID-19. COVID-19 spreads mainly among people who are in close contact for a prolonged period. The disease spreads when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks and droplets from their mouth or nose launch into the air and land in the mouths or noses of people nearby. The droplets can also be inhaled into the lungs. Recent studies indicate people who are infected but do not have symptoms likely play a role in the spread of COVID-19 as well.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends we: