12 WAYS TO HELP AN ALZHEIMERS CAREGIVER

One in 10 Americans over age 65 years and almost half of those over age 85 years have Alzheimer’s disease or a related type of dementia.  Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, involves a gradual breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. Affected persons lose the ability to interpret information and send messages to their bodies to behave in certain ways. Over time they experience mental, emotional, behavioral and physical changes, necessitating increasing amounts of….

PROBATE BASICS

Probate is the legal process of transferring ownership of property from the decedent to his or her heirs either by accepting the validity of their last will and testament or by following the Kentucky laws of intestacy.  For a will to be valid, it must be “self-proven” or proven as valid in court by at least one of the witnesses.  A valid will can also be holographic: written entirely in the handwriting of the decedent, signed, and dated.

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CONTAINER GARDENING

Gardens are great, but they require a lot of time, labor and money. They also require land space and good soil. Container gardening skirts all these obstacles, offering reduced time, effort and costs, and can be enjoyed in an apartment or other home lacking a yard. Vegetables and herbs can be grown in containers on a balcony, patio or walkway.

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Snow sledding with family members has long been a part of winter fun. You probably went sledding as a child, and you’ll want to share this fun activity with your children. From a health and wellness perspective, sledding can also cause injuries, some of them pretty serious, such as head injuries, the most common sledding accidents seen in emergency rooms. These can even be deadly. Children sledding can risk injury in collisions with objects, rocks, trees and other children or even adults. To keep children safe while sledding, make sure they follow these safety tips from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons:


1.  Parents or other adults must supervise children at all times while they are sledding.

2.  When hills are coated with snow, they may all look like great spots for sledding, but be very careful when choosing a location for your kids to sled. Not all hills are safe. Sled only in designated areas free of fixed objects such as trees, posts and fences.

3.  All riders must sit facing forward, steering with their feet or a rope tied to the steering handles of the sled. No one should sled head-first down a slope.

4.  Do not sled on slopes that end in a street, drop off, parking lot, river or pond.

5.  Children under 12 years old should wear a helmet.

6.  Wear layers of clothing for protection from injuries and frostbite.

7.  Do not sit or slide on plastic sheets or other materials that can

SLEDDING AND SAFETY: ENJOY SOME FAMILY FUN

be pierced by objects on the ground.

8.  Use a sled with runners and a steering mechanism, which is safer than toboggans or snow disks.


SOURCES & RESOURCES:


•  American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons http://orthoinfo.aaos.org


DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by dr thomas W. Miller