ADVICE FOR YOUR BUCKET LIST

Do you know what a bucket list is? Most people think it is a list of things you want to do before you die. A typical guess is people want to visit a particular place before dying. Based on an unscientific poll about bucket lists, that is not a bad guess. Travel appears to be a frequent bucket list ambition.  Anne is an American who is proud her ancestors lived for centuries on the group of small islands in the English Channel between the southern coast of England and mainland Europe.

REDUCE STRESS, INCREASE ENJOYMENT FOR A HAPPY 2018

Family caregivers provide practical assistance and enhance the quality of life for frail seniors who might otherwise require placement in a long-term-care facility. Typically, caregivers are spouses or adult children, many of whom are seniors themselves. Their role involves physical, psychological, emotional and financial demands. It can be a heavy load.  If you are a caregiver, consider the following strategies for not only surviving but thriving in the year ahead.

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DISCOVER A LOVE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

Curiosity, exploring interests and engagement are a few crucial ingredients to healthy and happy longevity. Enrolling in a class just for the love of learning is a great way to do this. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of Kentucky offers educational and enrichment courses, forums, shared interest groups, trips and more for adults age 50 years and older. Membership for the full year is $25; summer programs are at a prorated fee.

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Snow sledding with family members has long been a part of winter fun. You probably went sledding as a child, and you’ll want to share this fun activity with your children. From a health and wellness perspective, sledding can also cause injuries, some of them pretty serious, such as head injuries, the most common sledding accidents seen in emergency rooms. These can even be deadly. Children sledding can risk injury in collisions with objects, rocks, trees and other children or even adults. To keep children safe while sledding, make sure they follow these safety tips from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons:


1.  Parents or other adults must supervise children at all times while they are sledding.

2.  When hills are coated with snow, they may all look like great spots for sledding, but be very careful when choosing a location for your kids to sled. Not all hills are safe. Sled only in designated areas free of fixed objects such as trees, posts and fences.

3.  All riders must sit facing forward, steering with their feet or a rope tied to the steering handles of the sled. No one should sled head-first down a slope.

4.  Do not sled on slopes that end in a street, drop off, parking lot, river or pond.

5.  Children under 12 years old should wear a helmet.

6.  Wear layers of clothing for protection from injuries and frostbite.

7.  Do not sit or slide on plastic sheets or other materials that can

SLEDDING AND SAFETY: ENJOY SOME FAMILY FUN

be pierced by objects on the ground.

8.  Use a sled with runners and a steering mechanism, which is safer than toboggans or snow disks.


SOURCES & RESOURCES:


•  American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons http://orthoinfo.aaos.org


DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by dr thomas W. Miller