12 WAYS TO HELP AN ALZHEIMERS CAREGIVER

One in 10 Americans over age 65 years and almost half of those over age 85 years have Alzheimer’s disease or a related type of dementia.  Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, involves a gradual breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. Affected persons lose the ability to interpret information and send messages to their bodies to behave in certain ways. Over time they experience mental, emotional, behavioral and physical changes, necessitating increasing amounts of….

PROBATE BASICS

Probate is the legal process of transferring ownership of property from the decedent to his or her heirs either by accepting the validity of their last will and testament or by following the Kentucky laws of intestacy.  For a will to be valid, it must be “self-proven” or proven as valid in court by at least one of the witnesses.  A valid will can also be holographic: written entirely in the handwriting of the decedent, signed, and dated.

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CONTAINER GARDENING

Gardens are great, but they require a lot of time, labor and money. They also require land space and good soil. Container gardening skirts all these obstacles, offering reduced time, effort and costs, and can be enjoyed in an apartment or other home lacking a yard. Vegetables and herbs can be grown in containers on a balcony, patio or walkway.

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Teach your children to save for a rainy day as well by putting their gift money or part of their allowance in the bank. By helping them be aware, you may find you step up more to the task.


SOURCES & RESOURCES:

www.bankrate.com

We all know we need to save money, but many of us put off saving. We need to develop a rainy day fund. Having a “rainy day fund” gives you the peace of mind of knowing you are secure and better prepared to meet unexpected expenses.


Bankrate’s Financial Security Index says 20 percent of individuals do not have any money saved. Only one person in five has sufficient funds to cover three months of expenses. Everyone should commit to saving even a small amount monthly. It will add up and become more useful over time.


A rainy day fund should not be confused with an emergency fund. An emergency fund is money saved for times of unemployment and extended illnesses, when it is necessary to find the money to pay everyday expenses such as a mortgage, groceries and utilities as well as medical bills. An emergency fund is usually a savings of $10,000 to $15,000.


Rainy day savings are far smaller. This is the money you use to pay for service when the washer or dryer breaks down or to cover a few sick days or an occasional unexpected doctor visit, car repair or prescription. It is not for funding a vacation or the purchase of a new car. A rainy day fund typically is $1,000 to $5,000.



SAVING FOR A RAINY DAY

To build your rainy day fund, you may want to cut expenses or create extra income. There are two kinds of “rain” here:


Predictable rain:

Car insurance, property tax, car registration – expenses you know are coming and how much they are.


Unpredictable rain:

You know the expense will come, you just don’t know how much or when.


Save for both.

Here are some strategies for starting a rainy day fund:


JEAN JEFFERS

Jean is an RN with MSN from the University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60 Plus and Health &Wellness magazines. She has an article in the Fall 2016 issue of Today’s Christian in the Mature Years.

more articles by jean jeffers