HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

health departments across the country in implementing effective Alzheimer’s interventions. These interventions will focus on priorities such as increasing early detection and diagnosis, reducing risk, preventing avoidable hospitalizations, reducing health disparities, supporting the needs of caregivers and supporting care planning for people living with the disease. Furthermore, these Centers will expand innovative public private partnerships that focus on addressing cognitive impairment and health disparities.


Sources and Resources:


PUBLIC HEALTH AND ADVANCES IN SUPPORTING ALZHEIMER'S RESEARCH

Congressional leaders and members. Various organizations such as the Alzheimer’s Association through the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM) were instrumental in the development, introduction and passage of the Building Our Largest Dementia (BOLD) Infrastructure for Alzheimer’s Act (P.L. 115-406). The bill creates an Alzheimer’s public health infrastructure across the country to implement effective interventions focused on public health issues such as increasing early detection and diagnosis, reducing risk and preventing avoidable hospitalizations.


The Alzheimer’s Act that recently passed establishes Public Health Centers of Excellence nationwide for Alzheimer’s and related dementias by providing funding to state, local and tribal public health departments, increasing data analysis and conducting timely reporting of advances in the pursuit of treating and preventing Alzheimer’s and related dementias.


The Public Health Centers of Excellence will increase education of public health officials, health care professionals and the public on Alzheimer’s, brain health and health disparities. These Centers will also provide technical assistance to public

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP



Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

The mission of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is to enhance the health and well-being of all Americans by providing for effective health and human services and fostering sound, sustained advances in the sciences underlying medicine, public health and social services. The mission of public health is to fulfill society’s interest in assuring conditions in which people can be healthy. Public health professionals focus on promoting health, safety and wellness. The HHS protects the health of all Americans and provides essential human services for numerous medical and health-related conditions.


The three core public health functions include:


  1. the assessment and monitoring of the health of communities and at-risk populations to identify health problems and priorities;
  2. the formulation of public policies designed to solve identified local and national health problems and priorities; and
  3. ensuring all populations have access to appropriate and cost-effective care, including health promotion and disease prevention services and evaluation of the effectiveness of that care.


Alzheimer’s disease and dementia have become the focus of the public health community. Legislation crafts the public health vision by funding research to accomplish the mission and vision of public health in society. Congress recently exemplified this role by working with bipartisan