EMBRACING LIFE TO ITS FULLEST - LEGACY RESERVE

Patrons of Legacy Reserve at Fritz Farm can hardly wait to move into their new homes this month. Some of them signed up over a year ago.  “I chose Legacy Reserve as my future home for many reasons,” said Don Bayer, a retired Chicago Public Schools principal. “I was fascinated by the fact that it is going to have a heated saltwater swimming pool. I love to swim.”   “We decided we wanted to live here the rest of our lives,” said Loretta Jones, another resident looking forward to moving in. “So we are downsizing and we’re ready to go.”

….FULL ARTICLE

LIVING FRUGALLY

Many people in the United States with significant savings fear going broke in retirement, according to a recent survey. However, there are ways to live frugally to try to prevent that from happening.

1. Analyze your living situation. According to research, the cost of a home and home-related expenses accounts for nearly 43 percent of spending for people who are 65 to 74 years of age. ....

….FULL ARTICLE

TECHNOLOGY PRIMER FOR GRANDPARENTS

No one needs to be told the younger generations are attached to their technology. It used to just be computers, but now it’s smart phones. These days, if you want to stay in contact with your grandchildren – and sometimes even your children – you’d be wise to learn a few basic methods of keeping in touch in the digital age. A study released in 2012 by Microsoft and AARP called “Connecting Generations” found teens and their parents and grandparents are communicating more because of social media and other online tools.

….FULL ARTICLE

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”According to the Pickle-Ball, Inc. (www.pickleball.com), there are over 15,000 indoor and outdoor pickleball courts in the United States and at least one location in all 50 states. As more retirement communities adopt pickleball, there has been an explosion of new court construction throughout the United States, especially in the southern states. Pickleball is being introduced to children in physical education classes in middle and high schools. According to the Sports & Fitness Industry Association’s 2016 Participant Report, there are more than 2.5 million pickleball players in the United States.


So if you’re in a pickle about staying active as you age, consider learning how to play pickleball and find a community of seniors who enjoy the spirit of the game. You can also learn more about the sport at www.usapa.com, the USA Pickleball Association’s Web site.


SOURCES AND RESOURCES

Leach, Gale H. The Art of Pickleball (4th ed.). Two Cats Press, 2013.

Perhaps you, like many others, enjoyed playing ping pong, paddleball, racquet ball and even tennis earlier in life. Then as the years passed, those hips, legs, knees and shoulders gave way to aging. There is still hope for anyone Living Well 60+ in the golden years who wants to keep playing racquet sports, and it’s called pickleball.


Pickleball combines elements of ping pong, badminton and tennis. In this game, two, three or four players use paddles made of wood or composite materials to hit a perforated polymer ball, similar to a whiffle ball, over a net. This sport shares the dimensions and layout of a badminton court and a net and rules similar to tennis, with a few minor differences. Many players enjoy pickleball because it helps them stay active in their senior years. Tennis, racquetball and ping pong players love the competitive nature of the sport and regularly participate in local, regional and even national tournaments.


Pickleball was invented during the 1960s by three dads – Joel Pritchard, Bill Bell and Barney McCallum – from Bainbridge Island, Wash. Their kids were bored with their usual summertime activities, so the trio developed the idea and rules for the game. One anecdote says Joel Pritchard’s wife, Joan, started calling the game pickleball because the combination of different sports reminded her of the pickle-boat crew where oarsmen were chosen from the leftovers of other boats.

NEVER A DILL MOMENT WHEN YOU PLAY PICKLEBALL

According to Barney McCallum, the game was named after the Pritchards’ dog, Pickles, who would chase the ball and run off with it.


However the name evolved, pickleball has become popular among adults as well as children – so much so that the new Lexington Senior Center includes pickleball as one of its activities.


Terry Clark, a retired Lexington Veterans Administration Medical Center chief of social work and Army veteran, is an avid pickleball enthusiast. She says pickleball possesses all those characteristics that make a racket sport exciting to play and watch. “It is competitive, fast paced and fun,” she said.


Clark, who started playing pickleball after retiring, insists the best part of the game is the pickleball community. “The [experienced] players genuinely like to help new players become better and have fun,” she said. “They share their paddles, encourage them to play with everyone and give tips on how to be better. No wonder it is a fast growing sport.

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by dr thomas W. Miller