HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

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WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

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If everyone would follow these simple steps to prevent getting and spreading COVID-19, this pandemic will likely ease up that much quicker. Remember the symptoms of COVID-19:



These symptoms may appear two to 14 days after exposure. Emergency warning signs of COVD-19 include trouble breathing, persistent chest pain, new confusion, an inability to wake up or stay awake or bluish lips or face. If you experience any of these symptoms, please contact your primary care physician immediately.


Sources:




From the very start of the COVID-19 pandemic, older adults have been placed in the high-risk category. The chances of developing a severe illness from COVID-19 increases with age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC says eight out of 10 COVID-19-related deaths reported in the United States have been among adults aged 65 years and older. The greatest risk for severe illness from COVID-19 is among those aged 85 or older. An older adult who contacts the disease may require hospitalization, intensive care or a ventilator to help them breathe. They could even die.


Why are older adults at higher risk for contacting COVID-19? One reason is this population frequently has underlying medical conditions that compromise their health and immune system, hindering the body’s ability to cope with and recover from illness. These conditions include diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung disease. The coronavirus attacks the lungs, which are responsible for delivering oxygen to the bloodstream and removing carbon dioxide. As we age, the lungs lose some of their elasticity and resilience. Coupled with other health issues an individual may have, COVID-19 can cause a loss of airway and respiratory function.


What can you do to lower your chances of succumbing to COVID-19? Over the past few months the world has been dealing with the pandemic, some simple measures have proven to be very effective:

OLDER ADULTS AT HIGHER RISK FOR COVID-19