HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

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WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

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NURSING HOME RESIDENT RIGHTS

8.  the right to complain; and

9.  specific residents’ rights during transfers and discharges.


Special rights are in place to make sure a resident remains safely in the facility and is not transferred or discharged. As long as the resident has lived in the facility for at least 30 days, 30 days’ notice must be given for an impending transfer or discharge, or as soon as practicable if safety or medical reason requires immediate transfer. These transfers or discharges can be appealed through a hearing.


A resident can be transferred or discharged if:


1.  it is necessary for his or her welfare;

2.  the resident’s health has improved and nursing home care is no longer needed;

3.  the resident is endangering the safety or health of other individuals;

4.  the resident has not paid their bill; or

5.  the facility closes.


There are many avenues to resolve issues in nursing homes, but some

situations call for legal assistance. An elder law attorney can advise the resident and their family of their rights. The attorney may help the family communicate with the facility, strategize for a desired outcome and determine if the resident has a viable case.


An attorney is frequently retained to contest a discharge and represent the patient during the appeal hearing. Something important for residents and their loved ones to remember is to keep good records of all concerns, conversations, staff names, dates, times and as many other details as possible. These records will help the ombudsman as well as an attorney evaluate the situation and determine how to move forward.  

120 N. Mill St., Ste. 201 Lexington, KY 40507

Call Today: 859-281-0048 www.bgelderlaw.com

Amy E. Dougherty

PARTNER

Carolyn L. Kenton

MANAGING PARTNER

Mary Ellis Patton

SR. ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY

Katherine E. Finnell

ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY

Every nursing home resident has certain rights. The Kentucky Office of the State Ombudsman helps residents maintain their rights. Locally, the Nursing Home Ombudsman Agency of the Bluegrass serves over 5,500 long-term care residents in 17 Central Kentucky counties. The ombudsman’s mission is to improve the quality of care for residents of long-term care facilities with the goals of protecting resident rights, investigating and resolving residents’ concerns, empowering residents to make informed choices and working to enact laws protecting older and disabled Kentuckians. They are also committed to visiting residents as often as possible.


Nursing home residents’ rights are part of the Nursing Home Reform Law enacted in 1987 by Congress. They are incorporated into the Kentucky Regulatory Statutes. Nursing homes must meet federal Residents’ Rights requirements to participate in Medicare or Medicaid.


The general rights include:


1.  the right to be fully informed;

2.  the right to participate in his/her own care;

3.  the right to make independent choices;

4.  the right to privacy and confidentiality;

5.  the right to dignity, respect and freedom;

6.  the right to visits;

7.  the right to security of possessions;