HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+

The left side of the brain is said to be responsible for functions such as rational thinking while the right side is said to be the center of creativity. The common saying that “opposites attract” is very true. Neatniks and slobs do not just lack luck in choosing a partner. The combination of neatniks and slobs pertains to the laws of attraction.

Everyone has different tolerance levels for messiness. One person thinks leaving one dirty dish in the sink constitutes a mess, but another person can go to sleep at night with a sink full of unwashed dishes. You may like to keep your bedroom clean but your partner doesn’t mind some clutter. Some people have a natural instinct for a clean environment while others are more careless about their surroundings. There is a constant battle whether someone who is messy should make an effort to be tidy or if someone who is tidy should lighten up and start to be more carefree.


Unfortunately, there is no direct answer about who should change their habits. “Neatniks” have their own way of life just as “slobs” do. According to The Wall Street Journal, both suffer from a need for control. Neatniks say they need order and everything should be in its place. Slobs, on the other hand, don’t like someone else having control over them. Yet they may feel guilty they aren’t neat and resentful that someone is demanding that they should be. This contrast in a relationship can actually be a benefit because the conflicting parties can learn to accept each another and their faults.


There are ways to compromise to make life easier and more comfortable for both neatniks and slobs, to find a balance between the two. You can:

RELATIONSHIPS: “NEATNIKS” VS. “SLOBS”

•  Communicate. Make sure you set guidelines and boundaries together. Be sure    to discuss with one another any problems that may arise. Also, be willing to    negotiate and find a compromise in all situations.

•  Designate Set Areas. Allow certain areas in the house to be a little bit messier,    such as the bedroom. Designate the kitchen and the living room as clean areas    in case you have company.

•  Cleaning Days. Choose at least one day a week to clean (and do it together).    Sundays are a great day to clean the entire house and have everything in order    for the new week.

•  Focus on Your Relationship. The most important thing should always be the    relationship. Make time to focus on one another and the reasons why you are    together.


In their book The Odd Couple Syndrome: Resolving the Neat/ Sloppy Dilemma, Selwyn Mills and Max Weisser cited a study that found 80 percent of people who are left brained consider themselves neat, while 75 percent of right-brain individuals consider themselves slobs. The left and right sides of the brain are attracted to each other based on strengths and weaknesses.

TANIQUA WARD, M.S

TaNiqua Ward is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by taniqua ward