ADVICE FOR YOUR BUCKET LIST

Do you know what a bucket list is? Most people think it is a list of things you want to do before you die. A typical guess is people want to visit a particular place before dying. Based on an unscientific poll about bucket lists, that is not a bad guess. Travel appears to be a frequent bucket list ambition.  Anne is an American who is proud her ancestors lived for centuries on the group of small islands in the English Channel between the southern coast of England and mainland Europe.

REDUCE STRESS, INCREASE ENJOYMENT FOR A HAPPY 2018

Family caregivers provide practical assistance and enhance the quality of life for frail seniors who might otherwise require placement in a long-term-care facility. Typically, caregivers are spouses or adult children, many of whom are seniors themselves. Their role involves physical, psychological, emotional and financial demands. It can be a heavy load.  If you are a caregiver, consider the following strategies for not only surviving but thriving in the year ahead.

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DISCOVER A LOVE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

Curiosity, exploring interests and engagement are a few crucial ingredients to healthy and happy longevity. Enrolling in a class just for the love of learning is a great way to do this. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of Kentucky offers educational and enrichment courses, forums, shared interest groups, trips and more for adults age 50 years and older. Membership for the full year is $25; summer programs are at a prorated fee.

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If a memory or cognitive disorder is diagnosed, brief, focused followup visits to the clinic, usually every six months, will be scheduled. After assessing additional questionnaires and performing different exams, medication adjustments and referrals to appropriate services will be given if needed.


The individualized care plan may include consultation or ongoing care with one or more multidisciplinary services. Baptist Home Care Services offers home safety assessments, person-centered program development to maximize independence and function, condition- specific education and information and social workers to provide care plan coordination with other support services as needed. Physical therapy with exercise programs are designed to improve mobility, balance and coordination so patients can continue performing their roles at home and in the community. Occupational therapy improves safety, judgment, behavioral issues and stress management.


Education and support are critical parts of the treatment. Freeman coordinates community resources and services as appropriate for the patient, family and/or caregiver. Patients and their family and loved one(s) are referred to a number of educational opportunities through- out the community.


“The main thing that sets us apart is we focus on support to the caregivers,” said Freeman. “That’s my job as a social worker, to help provide emotional support to the families.”


Additionally, patients can choose to participate in clinical trials, either at the Memory Care Clinic or other centers. “We are lucky enough to be chosen to participate in Alzheimer’s disease research opportunities looking at disease-modifying therapies,” said Freeman.


If you are interested in making an appointment for yourself or a loved one with the Memory Care Clinic, call Baptist Health Medical Group Neurology at (859) 260-4330. Most major insurance policies, Medicare and Medicaid are accepted.

Memory disorders are frightening and frustrating not only for the person suffering from them, but also their loved ones. Fortunately, Lexington has a unique program to help patients and their families and caregivers.


More than five years ago, Greg Cooper, M.D., Ph.D., east regional president for Baptist Health Medical Group, saw the need for a more specialized, holistic, multidisciplinary approach for caring for people with dementia through his work that focused on memory issues. He created the Memory Care Clinic. As its director, he brought aboard social worker Stephanie Freeman, MSSW, as Memory Care Program Coordinator to design collaborations with other departments within Baptist Health Medical Group as well as with community resources. Neurologist Stephanie Sheffield, M.D., Ph.D., and physician assistant Jessica Cain complete the clinic’s care staff.


It’s incredible what a small staff of four can do to provide individualized diagnoses, treatment and ongoing care for the clinic’s patients. Working with each patient and their family and/or caregivers, the staff crafts a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach that offers a variety of services to help each person live a more functional life. These services include family care coordination, home health services, outpatient rehabilitative services (speech, physical and occupational therapies) and access to the Baptist Health Lexington Lifeline, which offers 24/7 emergency response services.   

MEMORY CARE CLINIC FILLS NEED FOR HOLISTIC APPROACH TO DEMENTIA

“What is unique about our neurology clinic is the multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment for memory disorders, as well as the care and support we are able to offer family caregivers,” said Freeman. “Within Baptist Health Lexington and our Memory Care Clinic, we offer many dementia-specific services as part of our treatment plan, including clinical trials and family support. This allows us to provide compassionate care for our patients with memory disorders and their loved ones.


”New patients initially undergo an evaluation. Prior to the first appointment, the patient and his or her family and/or loved one(s) fill out a series of questionnaires covering medical history and current symptoms. There is no definitive diagnostic test for dementia, but blood tests can rule out other conditions such as tumors or metabolic issues. Often a thyroid problem or lack of B12 can mimic dementia. A CAT scan, MRI, EEG or spinal fluid test may be performed. Medications may be prescribed. For most memory disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, cognitive enhancer medications called cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Razadyne and Exelon) along with the medication Namenda are prescribed.

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela S. Hoover is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by Angela S. Hoover