12 WAYS TO HELP AN ALZHEIMERS CAREGIVER

One in 10 Americans over age 65 years and almost half of those over age 85 years have Alzheimer’s disease or a related type of dementia.  Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, involves a gradual breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. Affected persons lose the ability to interpret information and send messages to their bodies to behave in certain ways. Over time they experience mental, emotional, behavioral and physical changes, necessitating increasing amounts of….

PROBATE BASICS

Probate is the legal process of transferring ownership of property from the decedent to his or her heirs either by accepting the validity of their last will and testament or by following the Kentucky laws of intestacy.  For a will to be valid, it must be “self-proven” or proven as valid in court by at least one of the witnesses.  A valid will can also be holographic: written entirely in the handwriting of the decedent, signed, and dated.

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CONTAINER GARDENING

Gardens are great, but they require a lot of time, labor and money. They also require land space and good soil. Container gardening skirts all these obstacles, offering reduced time, effort and costs, and can be enjoyed in an apartment or other home lacking a yard. Vegetables and herbs can be grown in containers on a balcony, patio or walkway.

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seniors feel lost and depressed after they quit their jobs, so a part-time job would ensure you remain busy.


Living frugally is a lifestyle that covers the basics in the least expensive way possible. You don’t have to give up everything and live like a hermit. Having a thrifty yet fabulous life in retirement is possible with a little discipline and attention to detail.


SOURCES & RESOURCES:

•  Free From Broke (www.freefrombroke.com)

•  Frugal Retirement Living (www.frugal-retirement-living.com)

•  The Street (www.thestreet.com )

•  USA Today (www.usatoday.com)

Many people in the United States with significant savings fear going broke in retirement, according to a recent survey. However, there are ways to live frugally to try to prevent that from happening.


1. Analyze your living situation. According to research, the cost of a home and home-related expenses accounts for nearly 43 percent of spending for people who are 65 to 74 years of age. So, to save money, it may be worth downsizing to a smaller home, which also gives you a chance to earn money by selling items you no longer need.


2. Plan ahead if you are thinking of shifting to another home or a different part of the country. Ensure the area has the amenities you’re looking for, such as medical facilities, places of worship, colleges and universities. Make sure you’re going to be comfortable there.


3. Check out senior discounts, deals and offers from hotels, restaurants, drugstores, etc. Some tickets to museums and live performances come with discounts for seniors, so make use of them. In Florida, people who are 60 and older can audit any college course anywhere in the state at no cost, but they don’t get any college credit.


4. Cut the fat from your food budget. It’s cheaper to make more meals at home after retirement. If you choose to dine out, find places

LIVING FRUGALLY

that offer less expensive meals and again, take advantage of senior discount offers.


5. Be a savvy grocery shopper. Keep a lookout for good deals wherever you shop, including dollar stores, wholesale clubs and farmers markets. Look for coupons in the newspaper and stores and check out online discounts and coupons as well. If you plan your meals for the week and make a shopping list, you’ll make fewer trips to the grocery store and waste less food.


6. Evaluate your bills and costs. If you’re not using most of your cable channels, consider scaling back to a more affordable package. Couples with two cars may be able to get by with one to cut maintenance and gas costs. Retirement is a good time to consider going in for more compact and fuel-efficient vehicles.


7. Take charge of your medical costs. Always ask your doctor what different diagnostic tests will cost.


8. Look for other sources of income. You can even consider part-time work. Many

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer and blogger who has a keen interest in health and wellness. She can be approached through her blog (www.aha-now.com) and Web site, www.harleenasingh.com. Connect with her on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

more articles by harleena singh