ADVICE FOR YOUR BUCKET LIST

Do you know what a bucket list is? Most people think it is a list of things you want to do before you die. A typical guess is people want to visit a particular place before dying. Based on an unscientific poll about bucket lists, that is not a bad guess. Travel appears to be a frequent bucket list ambition.  Anne is an American who is proud her ancestors lived for centuries on the group of small islands in the English Channel between the southern coast of England and mainland Europe.

REDUCE STRESS, INCREASE ENJOYMENT FOR A HAPPY 2018

Family caregivers provide practical assistance and enhance the quality of life for frail seniors who might otherwise require placement in a long-term-care facility. Typically, caregivers are spouses or adult children, many of whom are seniors themselves. Their role involves physical, psychological, emotional and financial demands. It can be a heavy load.  If you are a caregiver, consider the following strategies for not only surviving but thriving in the year ahead.

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DISCOVER A LOVE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

Curiosity, exploring interests and engagement are a few crucial ingredients to healthy and happy longevity. Enrolling in a class just for the love of learning is a great way to do this. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of Kentucky offers educational and enrichment courses, forums, shared interest groups, trips and more for adults age 50 years and older. Membership for the full year is $25; summer programs are at a prorated fee.

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The U.S. Census Bureau reports over the past decade the number of unmarried senior partners has increased by 70 percent. Seniors cohabit for many reasons. These include love and friendship, inheritance concerns and an anti-marriage attitude because of a previous unhappy marital experience.


For many seniors, finances are the biggest issue precluding matrimony. Married people usually receive legal rights and protections and have certain obligations that unmarried people don’t get automatically. When it comes to issues such as hospital visitation, inheritance, immigration, owning property, taxes, survivors’ benefits and Social Security, marital status matters.


Seniors need to know how matrimony may affect pensions and Social Security. The Social Security Administration says you cannot receive survivor’s benefits if you remarry before the age of 60 unless the later marriage ends, whether by death, divorce or annulment. If you remarry after age 60 (50 if disabled), you can still collect benefits on your former spouse’s record. When you reach age 62 or older, you may get the retirement benefits of your new spouse. But if you were in a long-term marriage that ended in divorce and you are receiving alimony, you would most likely have to give it up when you remarry.  

LEGAL ISSUES FOR UNMARRIED SENIORS LIVING TOGETHER

If you’re considering cohabitation as a senior, here are some tips:


HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer and blogger who has a keen interest in health and wellness. She can be approached through her blog (www.aha-now.com) and Web site, www.harleenasingh.com. Connect with her on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

more articles by harleena singh