HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT


Just as we were beginning to breathe a maskless sigh of relief, B.1.617.2, a COVID-19 variant, suddenly sprang up and put our return to “normal” on hold.


Mutated forms of the virus, called variants, have begun appearing around the world. They are slightly different from the original strains. The delta variant is a “variant of concern,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This means there is reason to suspect it may pose a new and somewhat different health threat to humans.


The delta variant was first detected in India in December 2020. The first recorded cases of delta-variant COVID-19 occurred in the United States in March 2021. By July, it had become the dominant form of COVID-19 in the country. It appears to be more contagious than the original virus, but the extent of the health risk represented by this variant is not yet fully understood. Where the delta variant has been identified, it rapidly took off and spread between people more efficiently than even the alpha variant.


A CDC study found 83 percent of sequenced samples from individuals testing positive for COVID-19 were attributable to the delta variant. Its symptoms are similar to other forms of COVID-19: coughing, headaches, fevers, sore throat, fatigue.

LATEST COVID-19 VARIANT A CAUSE FOR WORRY

The telltale COVID-19 signs – loss of taste and smell – appear to be less prevalent with the delta variant. Unvaccinated person are at greater risk of being infected by this variant than those who are fully vaccinated. Contrary to the original virus, which more heavily targeted the elderly, the delta variant puts young people more at risk. A delta- plus subvariant includes an additional mutation that attacks lung cells and reduces vaccine effectiveness.


You can protect yourself and your loved ones from delta and the other new variants by taking the same steps public health organizations developed for the original outbreak of COVID-19: