HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+

“It’s a brainstorming session on steroids, as I’ve heard someone describe it,” Skaggs said. “What happens in the meeting, like Las Vegas, stays in the meeting.”


The workshops, which meet the second Tuesday of the month, are powerful for members because it’s helpful to be around other inventors and entrepreneurs, said Skaggs.


“No one is totally successful if they work in complete isolation,” he said. “People are very helpful.


” The network launched expanded educational classes called the Empowered Inventing series in 2016. These are structured, step-by-step classes that cover many stumbling blocks for inventors and entrepreneurs, including behavior change, a known root cause of many failed inventions and businesses, as well as explaining processes of different stages of development.


One important focus is protecting new inventors and entrepreneurs from scams, which affect more than 25,000 inventors a year at an estimated cost of $200 million. The network believes the most powerful weapon against scams is educating inventors about the right direction to go when spending money and time on their invention, product or startup.


In 2004, the network held its first annual convention for inventors. It is now the largest inventor/entrepreneur event of its kind in the Midwest. Known as Inventor-Con, it attracts nationally recognized speakers and exhibitors from all over the country. The Louisville center opened this past September. The network started a YouTube channel (InventorsCouncil) to upload educational videos and is also looking into more ways to connect with others in rural areas in the state. It is also planning outreach programs with middle and high schools, colleges and other postsecondary educational centers, groups and associations.


Membership is $50 annually.


The council’s offices are located at 4101 Tates Creek Centre Drive, Suites 150-143. Visit www.KYInventors.org or call (859) 201-1311.

Ever have an idea for a new product or a solution to a problem? Most people do, but they don’t know what to do with their ideas. That’s where the Inventors Network KY comes in.


The Inventors Network Kentucky is a 501c3 non-profit dedicated to providing educational resources and support to inventors and entrepreneurs. It began in 1996 in Lexington as the Inventors Council Central KY.


“We help inventors and entrepreneurs through education, engagement and empowerment,” said Don Skaggs, president of the Inventors Council Central KY.


More than just a club, the Inventors Network is a comprehensive group of programs that includes presentations from speakers, hands-on workshops, brainstorming sessions and networking.


The network guides individuals through each step from idea to production and finally selling in the marketplace. It can even provide referrals to private and governmental agencies across Kentucky.


“There are associations like ours, but we strive to do something very unique, especially with our workshop programs,” said Skaggs.    

INVENTORS NETWORK KY

A self-described “serial inventor” since 1991, Skaggs began attending council meetings in 2001 after he saw a newspaper ad about it. The network has two different types of monthly meetings. The first meeting, which is free and open to the public, is held the first Tuesday of the month. It features expert speakers and provides networking and learning opportunities. Topics covered include patent law, prototyping, marketing, sales, finances and licensing. These meetings not only cover basic information and instruction but also focus on individual behaviors to cultivate – and shun – for success. A prevalent behavior for many is to treat their idea or product like a baby. But babies cost money.


“The day they stop treating their invention or product like a baby, it begins to be like an actual product,” Skaggs said.


The second meeting is a members-only workshop. These brainstorming sessions are held under a joint confidentiality agreement. Here members share ideas and explain where they’re at and what they might be stuck on so other members can offer ideas and solutions. The non-disclosure agreement protects against idea theft.

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela S. Hoover is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by Angela S. Hoover