ADVICE FOR YOUR BUCKET LIST

Do you know what a bucket list is? Most people think it is a list of things you want to do before you die. A typical guess is people want to visit a particular place before dying. Based on an unscientific poll about bucket lists, that is not a bad guess. Travel appears to be a frequent bucket list ambition.  Anne is an American who is proud her ancestors lived for centuries on the group of small islands in the English Channel between the southern coast of England and mainland Europe.

REDUCE STRESS, INCREASE ENJOYMENT FOR A HAPPY 2018

Family caregivers provide practical assistance and enhance the quality of life for frail seniors who might otherwise require placement in a long-term-care facility. Typically, caregivers are spouses or adult children, many of whom are seniors themselves. Their role involves physical, psychological, emotional and financial demands. It can be a heavy load.  If you are a caregiver, consider the following strategies for not only surviving but thriving in the year ahead.

….FULL ARTICLE

DISCOVER A LOVE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

Curiosity, exploring interests and engagement are a few crucial ingredients to healthy and happy longevity. Enrolling in a class just for the love of learning is a great way to do this. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of Kentucky offers educational and enrichment courses, forums, shared interest groups, trips and more for adults age 50 years and older. Membership for the full year is $25; summer programs are at a prorated fee.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+

Although most infusion drugs are covered under Medicare Part D, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has decided it does not have the authority to cover these infusion-related services, equipment and supplies costs under Part D. This leads to many Medicare beneficiaries being denied access to home infusion therapy. They then must receive treatment in hospitals at a significantly higher costs to Medicare. There is some coverage under Medicare Part B for certain therapies administered using durable medical equipment, such as a mechanical or electronic external infusion pump.

Infusion therapy involves administering medications intravenously by needle or catheter rather than orally. It is used when a patient’s condition is so severe that oral medications are not effective. Injections can also be delivered into muscles or epidural routes – the membranes surrounding the spinal cord. The medications can be antibiotics, antifungals, antivirals, chemotherapy, hydration, pain management and parenteral nutrition. Additionally, blood factors, corticosteroids, inotropic heart medications, growth hormones, immunoglobulin and other types of biologics can be given through infusion therapy.


Infusion therapy is often used for infections that are unresponsive to oral antibiotics, as well as for cancer and cancer-related pain. Patients with chronic pain, gastrointestinal diseases, congestive heart failure, Crohn’s disease, hemophilia, immune deficiencies, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and other ailments also benefit from infusion therapy. The most common type of infusion therapy is IV antibiotics for cellulitis, sepsis, osteomyelitis, urinary tract infections, pneumonia and sinusitis.


Infusion therapy is generally done in the patient’s own home, reducing healthcare costs. This also allows for minimal disruption of the patient’s day-to-day life. Infusion therapy can also be delivered at outpatient infusion sites. Both at-home and outpatient infusion sites are

INFUSION THERAPY ADMINISTERED WHEN ORAL MEDS ARE INEFFECTIVE

called alternate-site infusion therapy because they are alternatives to an inpatient hospital delivery setting. Currently, alternate-site infusion therapy is estimated to cost about $9 billion to $11 billion a year in U.S. health care expenditures. More than 1,500 infusion pharmacy locations offer infusion therapy, according to the National Home Infusion Association (www.nhia.org).


Nearly all commercial health plans consider home infusion therapy to be a medical service reimbursable under the insurance policy’s medical benefit, as opposed to a prescription drug benefit that is paid for using a per diem for clinical services, supplies and equipment with separate payments for the drugs and their delivery. Government health plans such as Medicaid, TRICARE and the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program also reimburse for home infusion therapy; however, in a few states, Medicaid has some gaps in the extent of coverage. Medicare’s fee-for-service program – Parts A, B and D – is the only major health plan in the country that has not recognized home infusion therapy has a benefit. Therefore, most Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in the fee-for-service program cannot afford to receive infusion therapy at home because of the professional services, specialized equipment and supplies that are required for home infusion therapy.

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela S. Hoover is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by Angela S. Hoover