HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+

something wrong.”


When a senior applies to become an SHS helper, he or she is asked to fill out a form indicating how many hours a week they would like to work and whether they are available for weekend or night work. They also list how many of the services SHS offers they are comfortable performing, including personal services such as feeding, bathing and dressing. SHS helpers will also make companionship visits and do light housekeeping, cooking and gardening. They provide transportation to doctor’s appointments and other destinations, assist with daily errands, care for those with Alzheimer’s or other dementias and help with many other activities from a two-hour minimum through 24/7 care. Phillips says the two-hour minimum time works well. If the errand or task at hand does not take quite two hours, her helpers gladly add services. For example, if the trip to the doctor takes less than two hours, the helper may ask if the care receiver would like to stop at the grocery store and then helps put away the groceries when they arrive back at the care receiver’s home. Or there might be time to do laundry or other household chores.


Currently, Phillips’ franchise is the only location of SHS in Kentucky. Her providers now are located in Fayette, Madison and Jessamine counties. She hopes to expand in the future. SHS was founded by Kiran and Phillip Yocom. Kiran, a native of India, worked with Mother Teresa for 14 years. After coming to the United States, where she met and married Phillip, Kiran felt a great personal mission to care for those who were unable to care for themselves. From this ambition, she and her husband created SHS in 1998. Kiran is the organization’s chairwoman and Phillip is the president/CEO of the organization. They have worked with hundreds of helpers and clients and SHS continues to grow geographically. The Yocoms have expanded their training and added services in response to the needs of clients.


Phillips says SHS charges from $18 to $20 an hour. The helper is paid about half of that. The other half helps Phillips pay the cost of liability insurance, workman’s comp, taxes, advertising and the other expenses necessary for maintaining an office.


For more information about becoming a helper, a care receiver or a franchise holder, call the Lexington SHS office at (859) 309-5535 or send an e-mail to lynn@seniorcarelexingtonky.com


Seniors Helping Seniors 710 East Main St., Suite 48 Lexington, KY 40502

Seniors Helping Seniors (SHS) is an in-home senior-care service founded more than 10 years ago and headquartered in Pennsylvania. SHS now has almost 300 franchise locations coast to coast in the United States.


What sets SHS apart is that all the care providers are seniors themselves. Lynn Phillips, who owns and operates the Lexington SHS franchise, says this is one of the most satisfying things about her business. Senior care providers, Phillips says, can recognize the problems of aging, identifying with and helping other older person in exceptional ways.


 “I just think it’s a wonderful opportunity to connect the providers, who are all more than 50 years old, with senior receivers,” Phillips said. “Our providers are mature, able-bodied adults. They love and care so much about the care receivers. Most of them are retired or semi-retired and they simply want to do some- thing they feel is meaningful and worthwhile and helps others.”


When a care receiver or a family member calls to inquire about SHS services, Phillips prefers to actually go into the home of the person who has requested help. She says each home is unique and people have their own ways of doing things. Phillips likes to talk with the person who has been the primary caregiver, often an adult child, and find out what that person and the care receiver want from SHS. “I meet with the

SENIORS HELPING SENIORS - IN-HOME CARE SERVICE PAIRS PROVIDERS WITH THOSE IN NEED

caregiver and have them explain to us exactly what they want out of us,” she said. She wants to be sure both the care receiver and the senior coming in to help are comfortable with what the care- giver is being asked to do.


The franchise offers training for caregivers. This includes not only state-required training about elder abuse but also communication and some of the skills taught in certified nursing assistant (CNA) training. Phillips does extra training if she sees a particular need. SHS does a drug screening, a thorough criminal background check and a tuberculosis screening on all applicants. Providers come from a wide range of backgrounds. Currently among Phillips’ providers are a nurse, a social worker, a woman who worked in a medical laboratory and a gentleman who is a retired engineer. Phillips says she has heard the horror stories about some people taking advantage of vulnerable seniors and understands the trust issues some seniors have about having paid caregivers in their homes. But she has never had any reports of theft from the homes where her providers work.


“That’s the kind of people I have,” she said. “They want to do everything they can to stay above board and separate themselves from the appearance of doing

MARTHA EVANS SPARKS

Martha Evans Sparks is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by martha evans sparks