ADVICE FOR YOUR BUCKET LIST

Do you know what a bucket list is? Most people think it is a list of things you want to do before you die. A typical guess is people want to visit a particular place before dying. Based on an unscientific poll about bucket lists, that is not a bad guess. Travel appears to be a frequent bucket list ambition.  Anne is an American who is proud her ancestors lived for centuries on the group of small islands in the English Channel between the southern coast of England and mainland Europe.

REDUCE STRESS, INCREASE ENJOYMENT FOR A HAPPY 2018

Family caregivers provide practical assistance and enhance the quality of life for frail seniors who might otherwise require placement in a long-term-care facility. Typically, caregivers are spouses or adult children, many of whom are seniors themselves. Their role involves physical, psychological, emotional and financial demands. It can be a heavy load.  If you are a caregiver, consider the following strategies for not only surviving but thriving in the year ahead.

….FULL ARTICLE

DISCOVER A LOVE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

Curiosity, exploring interests and engagement are a few crucial ingredients to healthy and happy longevity. Enrolling in a class just for the love of learning is a great way to do this. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of Kentucky offers educational and enrichment courses, forums, shared interest groups, trips and more for adults age 50 years and older. Membership for the full year is $25; summer programs are at a prorated fee.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+

seniors. Forming healthy connections with others is a positive step towards maintaining good mental health. Jacobs says some things you can do to promote mental health include staying sociable, meeting with other middle-aged people for dinner or drinks, going to church, taking a class or getting together with your grandkids and going to McDonald’s.


“Friendships are good for you,” Jacobs said.


Volunteering is another great way to get out and about.


“There are public libraries in all our counties looking for volunteers,” Jacobs said. “If you like animals and want to get exercise without committing to a gym, you might volunteer with the Humane Society and walk dogs.”


Whatever you do, just don’t sit back and let the world pass you by.


“Staying active as a senior is so important, not just physically but emotionally,” Jacobs said. “You want to stay as busy as you can. Keep moving, even if it is walking to the mailbox and back. Just keep going.”

Health screenings can be lifesaving.


“Any individual of any age does better taking care of themselves before they get ill, but sometimes that is unavoidable,” said Lydia Jacobs, aging program coordinator with the Bluegrass Area Agency on Aging and Independent Living. “For the most part, with annual checkups, vitamins, eating healthy, drinking plenty of water and just being aware of your body, you will do better.”


What kinds of screenings should you have?


The American Academy of Ophthalmology says it is important to have a complete eye exam with your ophthalmologist every year or two after age 65 to check for age-related eye diseases such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma or cataracts. It also emphasized the necessity of having a good night’s sleep because during sleep the eyes clear out irritants such as dust, allergens or smoke that may have accumulated in them throughout the day.


The National Institutes of Health says if you are between ages 55 and 80, have a 30-pack year smoking history and smoke now or have quit in the past 15 years, you should get screened for lung cancer. Quitting is one of the best decisions you can make for your health.  

HEALTH SCREENINGS FOR SENIORS

The U.S. Preventive Task Force offers some other useful screening recommendations:

•  Women above age 40 should get a screening mammography every one to two years.

•  Between ages 21 and 65, women should get a Pap smear every three years.

•  From ages 50 to 75, you should be checked for colorectal cancer.

•  Obesity screening and counseling is important for anyone with a body mass index greater than 30.

•  People over age 65 should be screened for osteoporosis. Work with your doctor to schedule appropriate screenings.


“Your doctor is a good partner,” Jacobs said. “It is important to find a doctor you feel comfortable with, someone who tries to get to know you. This way you will be more willing to discuss emotional health and any changes you are going through.”


When people think of health screenings, they generally assume it only includes testing for cancer, heart disease and other physical ailments. But mental health screenings are just as important. Depression and anxiety are prevalent among

JAMIE LOBER

Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by jamie lober