HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+


The old adage, “Lie down with dogs, get up with fleas,” has never been more true than in today’s world. People still fall for the same old stuff : peer pressure leading to crime, addicts with their co-dependents and marriages that border on abusive.


Everyone has a deep and abiding need to be loved, and when you find that special person who seemingly likes you for who you are, you will do just about anything to keep that love affair alive. But what if that person doesn’t have your best interest at heart? The drug addict thinks the pusher loves him, viewing the one who gets and sells drugs as the catalyst for pleasure, for escape, for not having to deal with the realities of life and the world. This feels like unconditional love, but in fact it is a using, abusive love that eventually destroys.


These types of sordid relationships seem to more often befall the young – those without experience who feel they still have something to prove to feel all right, to be OK. Here is the newsflash of the decade: You’re already OK. If you feel being yourself is not enough, then you will never feel you’re enough. If you’re concerned about “being somebody,” Zig Ziglar had a great thought along those lines years ago: “If you’re somebody to anybody, you’re somebody.”


Too many people feel their selfworth is based on action. The truth is,

HANGING WITH THE RIGHT CROWD

correct action comes out of having a strong and healthy sense of self-worth and self-esteem, not the other way around. In a recent program, Dave Ramsey said he always finds it ridiculous when someone talks about a football player making millions of dollars a year. “Nobody deserves that kind of money,” he said. The person speaking in awe of the athlete has failed to realize the difference between a person’s economic value and his or her intrinsic value. A person’s economic value relies on his or her commodity. If a football league knows it will make $150 million if a certain player plays, it can strike a bargain to pay the player $90 million. But the intrinsic value of a person has nothing to do with economics. Everyone has intrinsic value for simply being a member of the human race. No action is required except to be a good person and play well with others.


Your view of yourself and the esteem in which you hold yourself determine where you go, who you hang out with and ultimately what you become. In a culture where money, fame and the house in which you live largely determine how you’re liked and to what degree, it’s easy to lose sight of this basic fact: You’re worthy without doing anything. You’re worthy for being human. And if you find yourself in a bad relationship or hanging with a crowd that is pressuring you to do the wrong thing, to make the wrong move, to go down the wrong path and be unhappy, it’s time to jump ship. Run from the bums and head into the light.

CHARLES SEBASTIAN

Charles Sebastian is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by charles sebastian