HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

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WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

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While You’re Out:



Be flexible about plans and expectations and give yourself an out. You may need to forego an event if a heat alert is issued. Don’t forget to protect yourself from the adverse effects of excessive summer sun and heat, too. You are just as important as the person you care for.

ENJOYING OUTDOOR EVENTS WITH AN OLDER RELATIVE


What To Bring:


LISA M. PETSCHE

Lisa M. Petsche is a social worker and a freelance writer specializing in boomer and senior health matters. She has personal and professional experience with eldercare.

more articles by lisa m. petsche

The long, hot days of summer bring many opportunities for being outside, not only on your balcony or porch or in your back yard but also at organized events. The latter may include outdoor wedding receptions, family reunions and other types of celebrations as well as sporting events, concerts and festivals held in various open-air venues.


As enjoyable as these may be for an older care recipient, it’s important to exercise caution and plan ahead because summer sun and heat can be harmful to older adults, especially those whose health is already fragile. If you are a caregiver, be extra vigilant as temperatures soar. The following tips will help you protect your care recipient’s health and maximize his or her comfort and enjoyment at outdoor events.


Before You Go: