HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

and wishes. She or he should be willing to fulfill your wishes and make sure they are followed. Be sure to discuss with the person the responsibilities of a health care proxy and get their affirmative before writing your advance health care directive or giving copies to others.


You can change or revoke your instructions as you get older or if your opinions on end-of-life matters change. Review your advance health care directive planning decisions from time to time, such as every 10 years, if not more often. Each state has different laws regarding advance directives, so be sure to find out what the statutory requirements are before drawing yours up.


Setting up an advance health care directive can give you peace of mind. In addition, it relieves your family members of the burden of dealing with health care decisions at a stressful time. The bottom line is, it’s up to you to decide what you want – quantity or quality of life, “heroic” measures or palliative care. Here’s hoping you will never have to use your advance health care directive. But it would be good to know you have one – just in case.


Sources:


No one wants to think about becoming incapacitated and being unable to make decisions about your own health care. Yet it is a good idea to prepare for this possibility now – long before you experience it. An advance health care directive can be a useful tool.


According to the National Institute on Aging, an advance health care directive is a legal document that lets others know about the types of medical care you would prefer. It typically consists of a living will and a durable power of attorney for health care. If you don’t want to be revived in a life-threatening situation, you can also include a Do Not Resuscitate Order in your advance health care directive. It goes into effect only if you are unable to speak for yourself or if death is imminent. It requires you to think of some worst-case scenarios. For instance, if you lapsed into a coma, would you want to be placed on a ventilator (intubation)? Would you want to be resuscitated if you have a heart attack, either with CPR or defibrillation? If you could not eat or feed yourself, would you want to be artificially nourished with a feeding tube? Your advance health care directive will make your wishes known, and your health care providers are legally obligated to fulfill them. Your advance health care directive also allows you to express your desires related to end-of-life care. You may want comfort care medication for pain or anxiety, even if it makes you lethargic. You can make your wishes about organ and tissue donation known.

DO YOU NEED AN ADVANCE HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVE?

Begin designing your advance health care directive by thinking about the current status of your health. Talk to your primary care physician about the decisions you may need to make. (Discussing advance care planning decisions with your doctor is free through Medicare during your annual wellness visit.) It is a good idea to research your family medical history and see if there is a possibility of developing conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure or diabetes. You will have a better idea of what you may find yourself up against as you age and what contingencies to keep in mind as you craft your advance health care directive.


You need to let your family and your health care providers know about your preferences. Keep a copy of your advance health care directive with your will. Ask your primary care physician to keep one on file. If you have to go to the hospital, give the staff there a copy to include in your records. Some states have registries that store your advance health care directive for quick access by health care providers. You can supplement your advance health care directive with a durable power of attorney for health care – a legal document naming someone to make medical decisions for you when you are unable to do so. This person, also called a health care agent or proxy, should be familiar with and respectful of your values