HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

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WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

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CROWNS PROTECT DAMAGED TEETH

The crown will be constructed at a dental lab. While it is being made, you’ll probably have to wear a temporary crown. Temporary crowns are generally made of acrylic-based materials or stainless steel. While you’re wearing the temporary crown, avoid sticky foods such as chewing gum or caramel – these can pull the crown off the tooth. Hard foods such as raw vegetables could also dislodge or break the temporary crown. Try to chew on the other side of your mouth.


Once you receive your permanent crown, you can chew, eat and talk as usual. Pain when you bite down while eating is a red flag letting you know the crown is too high, but this is an easy fix. If the crown falls off, contact your dentist immediately and follow her instructions for caring for the tooth until you can get the crown replaced.


Crown costs vary depending on the type of crown you choose. Porcelain crowns are typically more expensive than gold ones. On average, a dental crown can last for up to 15 years, depending on how much wear and tear it undergoes and how well you take care of it. Continue to practice good oral hygiene – brushing regularly, flossing and visiting your dentist  – after you get the crown.

A crown is commonly used when a tooth is badly damaged or decayed and a filling will not restore it. It is custom made to fit over the entire tooth. Crowns can also be used to protect a tooth after a root canal; anchor and attach a bridge; strengthen a fractured, worn or cracked tooth; or cover a dental implant. Both adults and children can be fitted for and benefit from crowns.


Created from various materials, such as gold or other alloys, metal or porcelain, crowns are made to match the natural color, shape and appearance of your teeth. Metal crowns, which cannot be color matched, last longest and rarely chip or break, as opposed to porcelain crowns that can. All-resin crowns are less expensive than other types of crowns, but they, too, wear down over time. All-ceramic or all-porcelain crowns provide a better natural color match and are more suitable for people who have metal allergies.


Getting a crown is process that often requires two visits to the dentist. At the first visit, your dentist may take X-rays to check the tooth’s root to determine whether there is extensive decay or a risk of injury to the tooth. An impression of the teeth located above or below the tooth that will receive the crown will also be made to ensure the crown will not affect your bite. On the second visit, the dentist will prep the tooth, sometimes filing it down to make room for the crown, and then apply the device.

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela S. Hoover is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by Angela S. Hoover