HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+

Vegetables grown in containers should be fertilized regularly. Make the first application three weeks after the plants have two sets of leaves. Repeat once a week, using a soluble plant food at one-half strength (according to label directions). Keep a close watch for insects and diseases that may attack your vegetables. After harvesting spring and early summer crops, replant the containers with vegetables for the summer or fall garden.

CONTAINER GARDENING

BEST PRACTICES

Use a commercially prepared greenhouse soil mix to grow plants in containers. Moisten the soil mix the day before you intend to plant for best results. Many mixes contain high percentages of peat, which requires time to soak up water. Peat moistens faster with hot water than with cold. A drop of dishwashing soap will help wet dry potting mixes. Fill a clean container to within half an inch of the top with the mixture. Follow the seed package’s instructions for planting. Sow the seed more thickly than needed in case some do not germinate. Put a label with the name and variety of the vegetable/plant and the date of planting in or on each container.


Water the seed gently with a watering can after sowing, being careful not to wash out the seed. Or put a burlap bag over the container to reduce water impact. Thin the plants for proper spacing when they have two or more leaves. Be aware container soils can dry out very quickly, especially on a concrete patio in full sun, so daily watering may be necessary. Water when the soil feels dry, but do not go to extremes. The soil should not be soggy or have water standing on top of it. Apply water until it runs out the drainage holes.

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela S. Hoover is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by Angela S. Hoover

Gardens are great, but they require a lot of time, labor and money. They also require land space and good soil. Container gardening skirts all these obstacles, offering reduced time, effort and costs, and can be enjoyed in an apartment or other home lacking a yard. Vegetables and herbs can be grown in containers on a balcony, patio or walkway.


CHOOSING YOUR CONTAINERS

Containers can made of clay, wood (cedar or redwood), plastic or metal. Feeding and watering plants is easier in big containers since small ones need more frequent attention. Choose the container size to match the plant’s growth requirements. Each container must have drainage holes in the bottom so the roots will not stand in water. If the container does not already have holes, make at least four small nail holes in the sides, half an inch from the bottom.


CHOOSING WHAT TO PLANT

As a general rule, nearly all leafy vegetables and any herb will do well in containers. Plant breeders have developed many dwarf or miniature varieties for container production. Crops with many fruits per plant such as tomatoes are good choices. A 12-inch by 48-inch by 8-inch box makes an excellent patio herb garden. Chives, thyme, basil, marjoram and summer savory will all do well in such a box. The sprawling growth habit of various mints, oregano and rosemary make them attractive for use in hanging baskets.