ADVICE FOR YOUR BUCKET LIST

Do you know what a bucket list is? Most people think it is a list of things you want to do before you die. A typical guess is people want to visit a particular place before dying. Based on an unscientific poll about bucket lists, that is not a bad guess. Travel appears to be a frequent bucket list ambition.  Anne is an American who is proud her ancestors lived for centuries on the group of small islands in the English Channel between the southern coast of England and mainland Europe.

REDUCE STRESS, INCREASE ENJOYMENT FOR A HAPPY 2018

Family caregivers provide practical assistance and enhance the quality of life for frail seniors who might otherwise require placement in a long-term-care facility. Typically, caregivers are spouses or adult children, many of whom are seniors themselves. Their role involves physical, psychological, emotional and financial demands. It can be a heavy load.  If you are a caregiver, consider the following strategies for not only surviving but thriving in the year ahead.

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DISCOVER A LOVE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

Curiosity, exploring interests and engagement are a few crucial ingredients to healthy and happy longevity. Enrolling in a class just for the love of learning is a great way to do this. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of Kentucky offers educational and enrichment courses, forums, shared interest groups, trips and more for adults age 50 years and older. Membership for the full year is $25; summer programs are at a prorated fee.

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and remember the child as well. The love of a lost child unites the Compassionate Friends group and brings its members together.


To learn more about how this group can help you, visit www.compassionatefriends.org

The loss of a child is one of the most devastating experiences a parent may face. You are not only losing a child; you are also losing a piece of yourself, and your future will be forever changed.


Compassionate Friends is an organization that supports families that have lost a child. Its mission statement says: “When a child dies at any age, the family suffers intense pain and may feel hopeless and isolated. The Compassionate Friends provides highly personal comfort, hope and support to every family experiencing the death of a son or a daughter, a brother or a sister or a grandchild and helps others better assist the grieving family.”


Over 57,000 children under the age of 19 years die annually in the United States, according to the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Regardless of the age or the cause of a child’s death, it is still devastating. It is important for families to seek help and support when facing such a difficult time.


Compassionate Friends is available in hundreds of locations around the United States. Families come together and provide emotional support to one another. The people who are part of the group have gone through similar experiences and are also going through a grieving process. Everyone suffers loss differently based on culture, religion and the

COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS HELPS WHEN PARENTS LOSE A CHILD

relationship with the child who died. There is not a certain way to mourn the loss, so it is important to be surrounded by people who understand what you are experiencing. You can seek help through family therapy and support groups such as Compassionate Friends, but there are ways you can help yourself:


•  Try journaling your thoughts and feelings. Sometimes it is easier to write what you are feeling instead of sharing it verbally with others.


•  If you feel comfortable, talk about your child. Share memories with people close to you. It may be painful at first, but it can also help you heal.


•  Engage in activities with your family. Try to maintain some sort of stability even though life may seem to be out of control. Your family can help you find that sense of control and some enjoyment.


Families mourning the loss of a child should allow the grieving process to take place. There is no timetable on how long you should grieve and it is important to be patient with the process. It is also good and helpful to find ways to honor

TANIQUA WARD, M.S

TaNiqua Ward is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by taniqua ward