HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

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WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

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Nations General Assembly to raise awareness about issues that affect the elderly and to stress appreciation for them.


By the year 2050, there will be close to 2 billion people aged 60 and older, according to WHO. This will be one of the largest and most rapid increases in older adults in the developing world. Adults are living longer and healthier lives by maintaining a better quality of life. The world is continuously providing innovative ways to stay healthy while aging.


Older adults play a critical role in the world today. It is important they receive the means and resources they need to remain healthy, and it is everyone’s job to make sure they enjoy accessibility. People need to be able to transmit the knowledge they have to teach the elderly what they need to know and, in turn, learn from them. The younger generation needs to make sure older adults are aware of the new things developing all around them. It is just as important that older adults are encouraged to be active members in society.


Earlier this year, WHO said, “Aging is a development issue. Healthy older persons are a resource for their families, their communities and the economy.” Older adults are great assets. They are staying in the workforce longer, volunteering more, becoming caregivers and taking on family responsibilities. The younger generation can help older adults find affordable healthcare and social services. They know how to find resources and they know about organizations seniors might not be aware of.


“Making cities inclusive of older persons means generating opportunities for their economic and social participation in accessible and safe environments,” said U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. “It also means providing affordable housing as well as the health and social services needed to support aging in place.”


10 Tips for Reinventing Yourself During September Is Healthy Aging® Month:


1.  Don’t act your age – or at least what you think your current age should act like.

2.  Be positive in your conversations and your actions.

3.  Distance yourself from people who don’t have a positive outlook on life.

4.  Walk like a vibrant, healthy person.

5.  Stand up straight.

6.  Cherish and care for your smile.

7.  Stop brooding and complaining about having no friends or family – go volunteer somewhere, take a class or invite someone to meet you for lunch or coffee.

8.  Start walking.

9.  Make an appointment for your annual physical and other health screenings.

10. Find your inner artist.


Source: Healthy Aging Magazine

Healthy Aging® Month is an annual observance designed to focus national attention on the positive aspects of growing older. The mission of Healthy Aging Month is to encourage local events that promote taking personal responsibility for one’s health, be it physically, socially, mentally or financially.


Healthy Aging Month was created by Carolyn Worthington, editor-in-chief of Healthy Aging Magazine.


“We saw a need to draw attention to the myths of aging, to shout out ‘Hey, it’s not too late to take control of your health; it’s never too late to get started on something new,’” she said.


Healthy Aging Month was first introduced when the baby boomers were about to turn 50 years old. “At that time, no one wanted to talk about growing older,” Worthington said. “It was that same 60’s attitude – ‘Don’t trust anyone over 30.’”


Today as the boomers turn 60 and 65, it’s a different story. “We recognized early on that careful attention to the combination of physical, social, mental and financial fitness was powerful in the pursuit of a positive lifestyle,”

CELEBRATE HEALTHY AGING MONTH AND INTERNATIONAL DAY OF OLDER PERSONS

Worthington said. “We have built our Healthy Aging programs around that concept for the government and private sector through this annual observance.”


September is a perfect time to celebrate Healthy Aging Month since this is when many people think about getting started on new tasks after the summer. Healthy Aging Month activities are designed to encourage people to rejuvenate and get going on positive measures that can enhance their overall wellness.


“Use September as the motivation to take stock of where you’ve been and what you really would like to do if money was no object,” Worthington said. “Then try it. Who says you can’t become an entrepreneur, start your own home business later in life, test your physical prowess or do something wildly different from anything you’ve done before? Only that person you see in the mirror.”


International Day of Older Persons is Oct. 1


The World Health Organization (WHO) celebrates Oct. 1, 2016 as the International Day of Older Persons. The holiday was first established in 1990 by the United

TANIQUA WARD, M.S

TaNiqua Ward is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

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