HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

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WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

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These may be signs of internal bleeding that could lead to extreme blood loss. Fast action could ultimately save your life.


Sources:


Blood clots can cause many life-threatening problems, including strokes and heart attacks, because they block the vessels and arteries that provide blood to vital organs such as the heart, lungs and brain. Blood thinners are used to prevent blood clots from forming.


There are two main types of blood thinners: antiplatelets and anticoagulants. Antiplatelet drugs prevent blood cells (platelets) from clumping together and forming clots. Anticoagulants increase the amount of time it takes for blood clots to form.


Blood thinners are known by various names, such as Warfarin, Coumadin, Eliquis and Xarelto. Most blood thinners come in pill form, but some, such as Lovenox and Arixtra, are taken intravenously.


Various foods, herbs and medications can interfere with blood thinners, making them more or less effective. Foods with moderate to high levels of vitamin K, such as cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, kale and asparagus, can lessen the effectiveness of some anticoagulants. Foods that are low in vitamin K include carrots, cauliflower, cucumbers, peppers, potatoes, squash and tomatoes. Some herbs interfere with the anticlotting abilities of blood thinners and can increase your risk of bleeding and the length of time you bleed. Alcoholic beverages and cranberry juice can also be harmful for those using blood thinners.

BLOOD THINNERS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

One side effect of taking blood thinners is bleeding that is hard to stop. Because of this, you need to be careful about other medications you take when you’re on a blood thinner. This includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – commonly used over-the-counter (OTC) products such as aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen. NSAIDs pose a higher risk of bleeding or heart attack if taken in conjunction with a blood thinner, even if only for a short time. You may not be aware that some OTC remedies such as cough and cold products and sleep aids have NSAIDs in them to help reduce pain. Other drugs, including birth control pills, can decrease the effects of anticoagulants and increase your risk of developing a blood clot. Be sure to discuss all your medications with your doctor if they prescribe a blood thinner for you, and take the blood thinner as directed.


The presence of blood thinners in your system can increase your risk of internal bleeding after an injury. If you are on blood thinners and you fall and injure your head or if you experience any of the following symptoms, call 911 immediately: