HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+


should be carefully counseled about the complexities and increased risks that may lead to the possibility of less satisfactory outcomes.


Sources and Resources


The U.S. Census Bureau (2019) reports about 27 million Americans are Living Well into their 70s. And this population group is showing increased rates of obesity.


Obesity has become one of the most significant health problems, affecting more than one third of the global population. The elderly population is not immune to the proportional increase in obesity. The prevalence of obesity rises progressively in this age group. Efforts to better manage this condition have led some older adults to choose bariatric interventions.


Bariatrics is the branch of medicine that addresses the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of obesity. It provides a range of interventions that include well-established, evidence-based dietary guidelines, exercise and medication management. When these frontline approaches are not able to manage obesity well, bariatric surgery may be considered as an alternative.


The most common bariatric surgery procedures are gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, adjustable gastric band and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. Bariatric surgery has been the focus of several studies. Notable is one study that found age does not appear to significantly increase the risks associated with having weight-loss surgery (Susmallian, Raziel, Barnea, et al., 2019).

BARIATRICS FOR OLDER ADULTS

These researchers suggest bariatric surgery gives obese elderly patients an acceptable result, and it can often improve their health and quality of life. A new consensus conference panel is needed to set appropriate guidelines and recommendations regarding criteria for bariatric surgery in older adults. The higher complication rates in elderly patients are attributable to comorbidities.


The clinical concerns for the aging population are controversial because of the limited number of established guidelines. The “obesity paradox” may also play a role. Initially established in the late 1990s, the obesity paradox is a hypothesis that holds that obesity and rates of high cholesterol may be somewhat protective and are associated with greater survival rates in certain elderly individuals or those with certain chronic diseases.


People considering bariatric surgery should know such an intervention carries some long-term risks for some patients. These include what is known as the dumping syndrome, a condition that can lead to symptoms such as dizziness, low blood sugar, malnutrition, hernia, ulcers, bowel obstruction, nausea and vomiting. While the conclusions of recent published research suggest elderly patients should not be denied bariatric surgical intervention only because of their age, they

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP



Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.