12 WAYS TO HELP AN ALZHEIMERS CAREGIVER

One in 10 Americans over age 65 years and almost half of those over age 85 years have Alzheimer’s disease or a related type of dementia.  Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, involves a gradual breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. Affected persons lose the ability to interpret information and send messages to their bodies to behave in certain ways. Over time they experience mental, emotional, behavioral and physical changes, necessitating increasing amounts of….

PROBATE BASICS

Probate is the legal process of transferring ownership of property from the decedent to his or her heirs either by accepting the validity of their last will and testament or by following the Kentucky laws of intestacy.  For a will to be valid, it must be “self-proven” or proven as valid in court by at least one of the witnesses.  A valid will can also be holographic: written entirely in the handwriting of the decedent, signed, and dated.

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CONTAINER GARDENING

Gardens are great, but they require a lot of time, labor and money. They also require land space and good soil. Container gardening skirts all these obstacles, offering reduced time, effort and costs, and can be enjoyed in an apartment or other home lacking a yard. Vegetables and herbs can be grown in containers on a balcony, patio or walkway.

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The holidays can be a difficult time but they don’t have to be. A little planning can go a long way. Communicate with your partner and let him or her know your desires during the holidays and how you prefer to spend them. Prioritize what you both want and create a wonderful holiday season together.

The holidays are finally here – and so is the holiday stress. The holidays are a special time to celebrate with family and friends, food and traditions. They are a time to spend with loved ones and make memories. The holidays should be a wonderful, joyous time of year, but with so many different things going on and meeting different demands, they can also present their own woes.


During the holidays, it is essential to have a plan. You should know where you will be spending the holidays or if you are hosting. Try to continue traditions that are already in place, but be open to forming new ones. Also, have a plan for the cooking, gift giving and other events that take place during the holiday season. Here are a few simple guidelines to help make decisions about where to spend the holidays.


Set Priorities. Know what your family means to you and whether being together for the holidays is important to them. Find out your partner’s key holiday moments and the holiday festivities that are most important to attend. If Thanksgiving is not important to your partner’s family, plan to spend Thanksgiving with your family and Christmas with your partner’s family. Work together to make sure you are both spending precious holiday moments with your families.  

AVOIDING HOLIDAY HASSLES

Don’t Commit. It is common for family members and parents to call to ask you where you are spending the holidays. Do not commit to the first person that calls. Set a deadline for you and your partner to decide where you will spend the holidays and with whom. This will allow you both to make a good decision based on the offers made.


Talk to Family. If you do have to divide the holidays, explain to the family your plan. If you plan to rotate which set of parents you spend Christmas with, explain that so everyone understands and has something to look forward to. Reassure the family you want to spend time with each side. You may even bring up the idea of hosting a joint Christmas so both sides of the families can be together.


Be Flexible. The wonderful thing about holidays is that they come around every year. Where you decided to spend the holidays last year does not have to be the same place you decide to spend the holidays this year. Be open to creating new holiday traditions based. Be ready to make quick changes in plans due to weather. Being flexible is one of the best qualities to have during the holiday season.

TANIQUA WARD, M.S

TaNiqua Ward is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

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